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Catholic children who died without being baptised were not permitted burial in consecrated ground. Most parishes had a special place, known as a Killeen or Little Graveyard, for their internment. Killeen comes from the Irish word Cillín meaning "Little Church". The unbaptised were also sometimes buried on the north side of a graveyard or on the boundary. The practice ceased in the 1940's.

In 1217 a Royal Charter granted the citizens of Dublin possession of the Liffey Fisheries up to Islandbridge.

The Turbary Right was the ancient right to cut turf in a bog. The right was dependent on landholding but the land to which the Turbary Right was attached did not have to adjoin the bog.

Truck was the payment of wages in kind rather than in money. It was outlawed by various acts of parliament but continued until the Great Famine.

A man who studied for the Catholic priesthood but did not proceed to ordination was known as a "Spoiled Priest". It was considered a social disgrace and the man was sometimes disowned by his family.

A Spalpeen, from the Irish word Spailpín, was a poor labourer traditionally working for one penny a day. Spalpeens presented themselves at a Hiring Fair carrying whatever tool was needed for a particular harvest where they agree terms with an employer. An itinerant Spalpeen was known as a Spailpín Fánach.

Souperism was the term applied to the practice whereby Catholics converted to Protestantism in exchange for food or clothes, especially during the Great Famine. People who converted in this way were known as "Soupers", "Jumpers", or "Perverts".

A Silenced Priest was a priest who had been suspended by his superiors. Such priests were often believed to possess special powers enabling them to cure illness or overcome the Devil or evil spirits. When all else failed, a Silenced Priest was often approached in times of trouble.

A Scullogue, from the Irish Scológ, was a farmer who had saved money and was in a position to give loans. The loans were repaid, with interest, after the harvest or when the debtor returned from a period of work as a migrant labourer.

"Praties and Point" was a fanciful dish among the rural poor of 18th and 19th century Ireland. When only a small portion of salt remained, the potato was pointed at the salt instead of being dipped in it. A variation on this was to keep a piece of meat on the table. The potato was rubbed on the meat to give it flavour.

The British Army operation to round up hundreds of Republicans in Northern Ireland for internment was known as Operation Demetrius. Operation Demetrius was put into action on 9 August, 1971 under section 12 of the Special Powers Act.

 

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