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St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin

 

St Patrick's CathedralSt Patrick’s Cathedral is the National Cathedral for the Church of Ireland (Anglican).

St Patrick’s Cathedral is located in St Patrick’s Close, Dublin 8, Ireland.

It is built on the site of an earlier church.

This church was St Patrick's Church, a wooden structure that dated from the 5th century.

St Patrick's Church was built in honour of Ireland’s national saint, Saint Patrick.

WellThe adjacent well is where St Patrick baptised converts.

In 1191 the St Patrick's Church was granted Collegiate status by John Comyn.

John Comyn was the first Anglo-Norman Archbishop of Dublin.

A Collegiate is a church with a body of clergy dedicated to both worship and learning.

It was dedicated to St Patrick on 17 March, 1192.

The present building dates from 1220.

The office of Dean was created in 1220.

Following a disagreement with the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church, St Patrick's was raised to Cathedral status in 1213.

St Patrick's was elevated to Cathedral status by Henry de Londres, successor to John Comyn.

In 1225 Henry III allowed collections for reconstruction work.

The Lady Chapel was added in 1270.

It is the only building in Ireland with flying buttresses.

Reconciliation DoorA dispute between the Earls of Ormond and the Earls of Kildare was resolved in St Patrick's Cathedral in 1492.

Black James, nephew of the Earl of Ormond, and Gearoid Óg Fitzgerald shook hands through a hole in the door of the Chapter House.

The door became known as the Door of Reconciliation.

St Patrick’s became an Anglican Church of Ireland Cathedral in 1537 after the English Reformation.

During the reign of Edward VI St Patrick's was supressed and reverted back to a parish church.

In 1555 its Cathedral status was restored.

During his conquest of Ireland, Oliver Cromwell stabled his horses in the nave of the Cathedral.

From 1666 the Lady Chapel was used by French Huguenots for their services.

The Lady Chapel became known as L’Eglise Française de St Patrick during this time.

St Patrick's CathedralThe Lady Chapel continued as a Huguenot chapel up until 1816.

During the Williamite/Jacobite War the Catherdral reverted to Roman Catholicism while Dublin was under the control of the King James.

After his defeat at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690 James fled Dublin and the Cathedral reverted back to Anglican.

The first performance of Handel’s Messiah took place in Dublin on Friday 13 April 1742.

The performance took place in the New Musick Hall in Fishamble Street.

It was performed by the combined choirs of St Patrick’s Cathedral and Christchurch.

Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, was the Dean of St Patrick’s Cathedral from 1713 to 1745.

The spire of the Cathedral was added in 1769.

From 1846 until 1872 the Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral was united with Dean of Christ Church Cathedral.

Much restoration work was carried out in the 19th century.

The work was paid for by Benjamin Guinness.

St Patrick's CathedralSt Patrick’s was enacted as the national cathedral of the Church of Ireland in 1872.

The funerals of two Irish Presidents have taken place in St Patrick's Cathedral.

Douglas Hyde in 1945 and Erskine Childers in 1974.

Because the Catholic Church forbade Catholics to enter a Protestant church, the entire government and the opposition remained in the foyer during Douglas Hyde's funeral.

The exceptions were Dr Noel Browne and Erskine Childers.

On 14 May, 2006, forty-one Afghan asylum seekers occupied the Cathedral and went on hunger-strike, some threatening to commit suicide.

On 20 May, 2006 they were forcibly removed.

Saint Patrick's Cathedral is in the Church of Ireland diocese of Dublin and Glendalough in the Province of Dublin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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